Enjoy the music in each one of us

At first glance, I see her industriously sweeping the floor as she always has. I’ve seen her here several times, this being an auditorium I’ve used for performances several times. She is of indeterminate age. 

I’ve rarely seen her gloomy. Today, though, I notice that Seethamma’s gait is awkward. She careens a bit to the left every time she steps back. I ask her why. The answer stuns me.   Seethamma has a misshapen foot, a fact I realize I must’ve always known. Three digits of her right foot are at right angles to the other two, a condition that has to be incredibly painful.   I ask her if this is a condition she has suffered from birth. She replies that an alcoholic husband cut off these digits while she was asleep as she refused to allow him to “sell” her child to an adoption agency.   An indifferent doctor stitched these digits any-old-how and the condition worsened over time.    Her smile is infectious. She tells me that it could be worse. There are people without limbs, with terrible diseases. She is lucky, she says. She gets to hear music everyday for free. It heals her, she claims.    She advises me to smile more on stage. As she continues humming her way across the floorboards, I walk across to set up my instrument.    Music is said to have curative properties. Across multiple platforms, I have observed people with the most traumatic pasts transform and heal. The process is oftentimes cathartic-magical waves of positivity attacking the toxins in our system.    Seethamma’s story is not unique. The condition of the average citizen is often mired in these issues. The happiness, then, is in the journey towards the light on the wings of melody.
At first glance, I see her industriously sweeping the floor as she always has. I’ve seen her here several times, this being an auditorium I’ve used for performances several times. She is of indeterminate age.
I’ve rarely seen her gloomy. Today, though, I notice that Seethamma’s gait is awkward. She careens a bit to the left every time she steps back. I ask her why. The answer stuns me.
Seethamma has a misshapen foot, a fact I realize I must’ve always known. Three digits of her right foot are at right angles to the other two, a condition that has to be incredibly painful.
I ask her if this is a condition she has suffered from birth. She replies that an alcoholic husband cut off these digits while she was asleep as she refused to allow him to “sell” her child to an adoption agency.
An indifferent doctor stitched these digits any-old-how and the condition worsened over time.
Her smile is infectious. She tells me that it could be worse. There are people without limbs, with terrible diseases. She is lucky, she says. She gets to hear music everyday for free. It heals her, she claims.
She advises me to smile more on stage. As she continues humming her way across the floorboards, I walk across to set up my instrument.
Music is said to have curative properties. Across multiple platforms, I have observed people with the mosttraumatic pasts transform and heal. The process is oftentimes cathartic-magical waves of positivity attacking the toxins in our system.
Seethamma’s story is not unique. The condition of the average citizen is often mired in these issues. The happiness, then, is in the journey towards the light on the wings of melody.

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